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FIFTH APPELLATE DISTRICT REJECTS GENERAL PLAN CONSISTENCY AND CEQA CHALLENGES TO LARGE SHOPPING CENTER PROJECT IN AN UNPUBLISHED OPINION


A neighborhood group, Naraghi Lakes Neighborhood Preservation Association (“Petitioner”), challenged the City of Modesto’s approval of a 170,000 square foot shopping center project (“Project”) on an 18-acre site adjacent to an established residential neighborhood. Petitioner alleged that the City’s approval was inconsistent with Modesto’s General Plan and did not comply with CEQA. On June 7, 2016, the Fifth District ruled in favor of the City in an unpublished opinion, Naraghi Lakes Neighborhood Preservation Association v. City of Modesto, 2016 Cal. App. Unpub. LEXIS 4149.

The Project area was within the General Plan’s “Neighborhood Plan Prototypes,” which were designed to create a blueprint for residential neighborhood development. One of the Neighborhood Plan Prototype’s policies requires: “A 7-9 acre neighborhood shopping center, containing 60,000 to 100,000 square feet gross leasable space.” Petitioner argued that the large size of the Project was inconsistent with this policy. The court disagreed, finding that the prototypes were meant to provide guidance, not inflexible mandates, and that the Project was in conformance with other General Plan policies. The court emphasized that perfect conformity will all policies is not required and that a finding of consistency should be upheld unless “no reasonable person could have reached the same conclusion.”

Next, the court found that the City had made the appropriate findings required by the General Plan to rezone the property and rejected Petitioner’s argument that the proposed environmental mitigation was not “adequate” because some traffic impacts were not mitigated to less than significant levels. Because other policies in the General Plan allowed the City to avoid making infeasible or prohibitively expensive traffic improvements, the court did not agree with Petitioner’s interpretation of “adequate” mitigation. The court did not consider other general plan consistency arguments proffered by Petitioner because these contentions were not raised in the administrative proceedings.

Finally, the court addressed Petitioner’s argument that the City failed to comply with CEQA because: (1) the findings of infeasibility as to certain mitigation measures were not supported by substantial evidence; (2) the EIR did not adequately analyze a reduced project alternative; (3) the urban decay findings were not supported by substantial evidence; and (4) the findings made in connection with the statement of overriding considerations were not supported by substantial evidence. The court held that there was sufficient evidence in the record to support the various findings singled-out by Petitioner and found that the City’s alternatives analysis complied with CEQA.

Accordingly, the appellate court affirmed the trial court’s judgment in favor of the City.



dateJune 16th, 2016byby


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